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20121027
20121104
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, by the way. >> yes. >> it deserves the applause. >> and it was -- i was looking a lot at the history of cbs and nbc, the big two, but abc has started coming on strong and it became the third of the big three. how did abc news did on parity with nbc and cbs? what is the timeframe that that happened? >> abc news to everyone always says it was the fourth that of three. [laughter] for the 60's and 70's. it was a very weak news organization by all accounts. let's be clear. abc does the weakest of the networks as well. if you recall, there were to nbc network and nbc had a spinoff because they had trust concerns. so letter golden sun started building up the entertainment part of abc and to some degree successfully in the 60's and 70's. he concluded the only way to really get to parity with cbs and nbc was to build a great news organization, not so much because he loved news, but because the local stations made most of their money, as they do today, off of their newscast. he needed to improve. so he turned to abc sports, monday night football, while the world's ports and it said, you go over to ne
, made cbs colleague, jason jackson. the story of this book were exceptional and i that i will ask us present at 2002 it could connect the stories come from personalities together to weave together a book that could define this decade through leadership ones. so i called carol andersen. carol andersen wasserstein richard in a helicopter accident. i called her on the phone as i did all the mothers who go for the book who lost their sons and i said carol, i would like to type you about richard. >> are you selling t-shirts quite >> no, ma'am, i'm from the naval academy and i have an important project like to talk to you about. i don't want to cut to the naval academy. she was actually torn at the time. she was suffering about her son said she had reached out to buy the academy family and we can do better. i said ma'am, we're writing about to honor richard. our classmate. over a hundred books to make him 30 make third roommate to would like to hear your voice. do it for richard, do for those who served. a few weeks ago, after we sold out our first printing at the naval institute press, i
these, cbs saying you got to concede, he said i don't think i lost. the polls are wrong again. when have the polls ever mistakenly said the republican has won? really! i am not worried about the exit polls. >> i thought you meant the ten point spread is in our state? >> i don't remember what you're talking about. [talking over each other] >> in light of yesterday's lorillard humans in the supreme court in university of texas, what do you think is the possibility and probability of ending affirmative-action? >> my law firm brought the case against university of michigan undergrad and law school, center for individual rights. we brought the original case ten years ago and won against the law school and undergrads because of sandra day o'connor who said we need 25 more years of affirmative action. now we have constitutional provisions with expiration dates. there is an interesting book avent tsurprise. liberals try to help how did they cover the failure of public school? affirmative-action. let's deal with the public schools and i suppose i should say, whether or not i always thought was a
, oops, didn't come out that way. in new hampshire, well, i won't run them all of these, but cbs harangued them, saying, you conceived, you lost the election. i don't think i lost. they counted the votes, and he was not losing. when have the polls mistakenly said the republican is winning? [laughter] really, i'm not much worried about the exit polls. >> oh, good, i thought you meant the ten point spread was in our favor, but it's in in the 2008 election was in obama's favor? >> i don't remember that exact column. >> i remember them all. >> better than i do apparently. [laughter] >> ann, in light of yesterday's oral arguments of the supreme court, university of texas case. what do you think is the possibility and probability of ending affirmative action in education? >> well, i hope very good. my law firm brought the case gebs the -- against the university of michigan and law school. we brought that original case ten years ago, won against the law school, lost against undergrads because of sandra day o'connor who says we need 25 more years of affirmative action. now we have consti
have president obama and mitt romney on cbs the other day. the president was expressing his disappointment that he hasn't been able to change the tone. george w. bush ran he was going to change the tone. everyone is always going to change the tone. the question is mitt romney promising by partisanship of it like lucy promising charlie brown she won't pull football? [laughter] >> yes, i think it is. i think that he has to nod to that there is no evidence he would govern in of bipartisan way to read george w. bush that is not elected president in my opinion but did not get a majority of the votes -- [applause] he ran that we as a compassionate conservative and you would have expected him to govern as a moderate and realize he presided over a very deeply divided country and instead he was one of the most radical presidents we've ever had, so i expect the same thing from mitt romney who is actually talked who is espousing more radical right policies than george w. bush ever did. like nixon and ronald reagan in certain ways looks like a moderate in terms of education mitt romney
you're frustrated to watch the daily news. will broadcast medium abc, cbs, nbc, cnn, fox, any thing with 9/11 or terrorism always guilty before you are proven innocent and rush to judgment. the reporting is not in depth. the problem media faces with the original foreign correspondent. they will living there they come back with the real story. with the arabs spring it was the beginning of the revolution now it was a different story because now we use youtube or bad quality television. but it depends. you can still read fantastic stories and use the terrible reporting on stations like fox news. >> how would arab media of fact -- defect or handle the matters in media? i suspect americans to enjoy positioning the and it was before. why is that? the palestinian issue the front pages was day touching point* because of the support for israel so i see the criticism. president obama also helped the american administration in. something interesting, burning the american flag, you could see that in syria. or the chinese flags. have the iranians, russians, now being burned regular the. governme
as well as operating -- cbs "newshour" past -- [inaudible] >> "don't ask don't tell," the elimination of the "don't ask don't tell" we are a year into this so i don't want to abstain it but it could not have gone any better than it has gone. i think it has to do first with how we rolled it out, how we briefed it and frankly we underestimated our younger populations and their ability, their acceptability of this issue. in my mind, so far it really could not have gone any better. there are still some things we have to work through but it has gone very well. in terms of our recruiting, i always caveat this because it has a lot to do with our economic and unemployment that the last two years up in the highest quality of recruits the army has said that i can remember. in terms of educational levels and in terms of waivers we have granted him a party recruited 30,000 for next year. which is half of our requirement. it's already done. there are people -- when the economy changes could impact us? c.'s, but right now it is not impacted our recruiting and it is does not impact their quality ope
and cbs networking for doing this. i appreciate it. look, it's a big election. and it's a big election for a number of reasons. but for my perspective as montana one of the most important reasons we're back in 1912. we come back to a time when corporations who give unlimited of secret money and influence the political structure of the country. and that is scary for a democracy. we have seen incredible sums of money come in to the state since the citizens united decision. money that has no transparency whatsoever. money that is being used to define me as something i'm not quite frankly, they cannot beat the farmer from big -- with the record that i have, for veterans, for sports men, for women, for education, for tax policy, for making sure that montana people -- is front and center in washington, d.c. over the last six years, i had incredible opportunity to work with some of the most incredible people in the world and they all live right in this state. veteran affairs committee at public meeting and i had a vietnam veteran come up and say you're not going treat the men and women coming
in the corpus area, and he won after a runoff by about 800 or 900 votes. >> cb solomon of -- solomon ortiz senior. >> that's exactly right. yes. but he arrived because first he was inexperienced in the ways of governance or politics at large. he arrives three and half weeks after everybody else did because of the recount, and so i followed a lot of these congressman around to get a sense of the irrational experience, and his was one of the kind of citizen politicians to try as you might can never quite catch up. always just sort of, you know, holding on to the medicine ball for dear life and never kind of getting a top of it. he was -- i mean, he told me he had this recurring nightmare that he was alone in his office and there was no furniture and only a phone that rang and rang and rang and he was never able to get it. he told a group of business lobbyists. you know you have that anxiety. dreams are really big. you know, that anxiety dream of going to school and looking down and not wearing your pants. you need to be the guys to tell me where my pants. the ones to tell me what things they
on walter cronkite. >> guest: a wonderful book. [applause] >> host: looking at cbs and nbc but abc came on strong and was 1/3 of the big three. how did abc news get on parity? what is the timeframe? >> abc news was the fourth thought of three. [laughter] it was very weak by all accounts. there were two nbc networks they had to spin off one but they started to build up the entertainment part. he concluded the only way to get to parity was to build a great news organization because the local stations made most of their money. so who created wide world of sports and the modern olympics said spend as much money as you want, which he did. [laughter] he built it up starting 1977 through the '80s by bringing in big stars. david brinkley, diane sawyer , ted koppel, he brought peter from overseas. he had barbara walters already. amazing graphics and was very aggressive. he built it up to a powerhouse. >> what was his personality like? >> guest: he was 18 yes. not in his demeanor. he was on the shy side and totally absent he never returned phone calls of anybody. at night you have a crisis there
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10